Image part of Flame Orchard by György Kepes, Paul Earls and William Wainwright for the Bienal de Coltejer 1972, Medellín, Colombia.
ACT at MIT

EVENTS in 2017 – 2018

SPRING 2018


In Our Present Condition…
recent work by visual art alumni
SA+P Dean’s Gallery, MIT, on view through May 2018

This exhibit includes artists Jennifer Allora, who represented the US in the Venice Biennale (2011); Jill Magid, whose work is on view at the Whitney Museum of American Art; Michael Rakowitz, recipient of the 2018 Trafalgar Square (London) Fourth Plinth Prize; Harvard Loeb Fellow Matthew Mazzotta; and artists Pia Lindman and Alia Farid, whose work was shown in the 2016 São Paulo Bienal, as well as other prominent alumni whose work engages with civic life and creates alternative models of contemporaneity.

February 6 – 28
The February School
Wiesner Gallery, Stratton Student Center
The MIT Program in Art, Culture and Technology graduate students will set up a temporary school as an intervention into the nested ecosystem of education at MIT. This school will be a subsystem of education where students and the general public will be invited to participate in ACT student-led classes, cinema cycles, exhibitions, discussions, conferences, fellowship, workshops, construction, and celebrations throughout the month of February. The intervention will use the structures and conventions of a typical university to explore other ways of learning, sharing, and building knowledge and community. Full schedule can be found here.

Opening on March 6
In Our Present Condition (N-Z)
Gallery 9

Exhibition of student work from 4.314/5 ACT Advanced Workshop in Artistic Practice and Transdisciplinary Research: Porous Boundaries, Shifting Borders, and Fertile Edges, co-taught by the CAVS50th anniversary curatorial team (Laura Knott, Lars Bang Larsen, Gediminas Urbonas).

March 5 – 29
Wind Egg
Keller Gallery

Screening of a film by ACT Alumnus Haseeb Ahmed that uses modern technology to explore an ancient myth. Please see In Our Present Condition… at the Dean’s Office Gallery for artifacts from the film, and The Wind Tunnel Model lecture on April  3.

March 7
Dragonfly Eyes
Bartos Theatre

A screening of Xu Bing’s Dragonfly Eyes,the first feature film ever made using only surveillance footage, with artist talk to follow.
Respondent: Eugenie Brinkema

March 16 – August, 2018
György Kepes Photographs: Kepes at MIT, 1946 – 1974

MIT Museum
György Kepes (1906-2001) was one of the most influential art practitioners, educators and writers of the twentieth century, and his work as a painter and art teacher has been celebrated in both exhibitions and scholarship.György Kepes Photographs takes a closer look at a body of work by the artist that has received less attention and study—photography. Featuring rare and never-before-seen photographs that span more than four decades of his creative practice, many of the photographs have been printed from original negatives that are not known to have been printed by the photographer, while others are vintage prints made by Kepes himself that have not been previously exhibited or published.

April 3
The Wind Tunnel Model
The ACT Cube

Florian Dombois and Haseeb Ahmed present their individual and collaborative artistic practices and research on wind tunnels. Together with the Research Focus in Transdisciplinarity Zurich, led by Dombois, they edited the “Wind Tunnel Bulletin.” Dombois will present last year’s project Galleria del Vento in Venice, while Ahmed presents excerpts from “The Wind Egg,” a film shot during an intervention at the von Karman Institute outside of Brussels and which was screened continually in the Keller Gallery from March 5 – 29. The artists’ wind research and projects subvert the language and methods of scientific experiment and reportage, using modern wind tunnel technology to engender new narratives and new, fluid speculations about the relationships among science, art and, engineering.

April 27 – 29
International Symposium on Zooetics

ACT will host an international symposium on Zooetics, a “word in progress,” that describes an area of trans-disciplinary study searching for ways to engage human knowledge and research with other forms of life in order to imagine designs, prototypes and interfaces encompassing all life, from mammals to mollusks to microbes. Ecosystemic understandings and the co-existence of humans and other life forms have emerged as crucial issues for thinking about and acting for future ecologies. This two-day conference addresses human and other life co-habitation from multiple perspectives, bringing together artists, anthropologists, scientists and critical theorists.

April – May 2018
Campus-Wide Events and Exhibits

Events and exhibits by internationally recognized contemporary artists will stretch and extend some of the key terms laid out by CAVS. Proposed projects include an artistic collaboration with MIT-based synthetic biologists and cancer researchers; a workshop and exhibit on machine vision; sonic interventions; and the MIT Island, a project supported by the National Endowment for the Arts to provide a new cultural hub for critical response to urgent water crises.

FALL 2017

Fall 2017
In Our Present Condition…
recent work by visual art alumni
SA+P Dean’s Gallery, MIT, on view through May 2018

This exhibit includes artists Jennifer Allora, who represented the US in the Venice Biennale (2011); Jill Magid, whose work is on view at the Whitney Museum of American Art; Michael Rakowitz, recipient of the 2018 Trafalgar Square (London) Fourth Plinth Prize; Harvard Loeb Fellow Matthew Mazzotta; and artists Pia Lindman and Alia Farid, whose work was shown in the 2016 São Paulo Bienal, as well as other prominent alumni whose work engages with civic life and creates alternative models of contemporaneity.

September – December 2017
ACT Fall Lecture Series
The Edge of Knowing and Un-Knowing
ACT Cube (E15-001)

The Fall 2017 ACT Lecture Series invites renowned artists and philosophers to help us challenge our habits of perception and expand our margins of thought. Artistic intelligence is drawn to the fertile edges of knowledge, engaging radically anticipatory modes of being, thinking, creating and acting without certainty.

The series will offer models for un-knowing science and technology as a way to dislocate and re-articulate knowledge production in proximity to technologies of planetary threat: how to navigate the camouflaged, the unknown, the deceptive, the trumped.

Monday, September 11
Trevor Paglen, The Planet is a Sensor

Monday, September 25
Cristina Ricupero, Don’t Believe A Word I Say

Friday, October 20
David Reinfurt, A Post-Industrial Post Script

Monday, November 13
Postcommodity, The Repellent Fence and Beyond

Monday, December 4
Judith Barry, A Discussion of Several Research-Based Projects


September 21 – March 5, 2018
György Kepes Photographs: From Berlin to Chicago, 1930 – 1946

MIT Museum
György Kepes (1906-2001) was one of the most influential art practitioners, educators and writers of the twentieth century, and his work as a painter and art teacher has been celebrated in both exhibitions and scholarship.György Kepes Photographs takes a closer look at a body of work by the artist that has received less attention and study—photography. Featuring rare and never-before-seen photographs that span more than four decades of his creative practice, many of the photographs have been printed from original negatives that are not known to have been printed by the photographer, while others are vintage prints made by Kepes himself that have not been previously exhibited or published. A review from The Boston Globe was published on September 28, 2017.

October 2017
CAVS Special Collection Launch

ACT stewards this important repository of a nearly 45 year history of collaborative and time-based productions generated by or related to the tenure of over 200 internationally recognized artist-fellows at the Center for Advanced Visual Studies at MIT. The launch event will bring together CAVS Fellows and the ACT community in celebration of the new ACT-sponsored “virtual museum” of CAVS.

Call for Submissions to Artistic Intelligence

A magazine for artistic interrogation and praxis within the confluence of art, culture, and science, Artistic Intelligence reckons with the future-led agency of art under today’s rapidly expanding and unsettling conditions of technicity. Exploring terrains of resilience, revealing sources and methods, and smuggling knowledge across disciplines and social spaces, the magazine proposes an alternative AI. Editor of the first issue will be art historian Lars Bang Larsen, co-curator of the 2016 São Paulo Bienal, and of ACT’s celebrations of the 50th anniversary of CAVS.

 

 

Please note that this is a project in progress and will be updated as new information becomes available. Check back often!