Speakers | Public Space? Lost & Found

Dennis Adams is an artist internationally recognized for his urban interventions and museum installations that reveal historical and political undercurrents in photography, cinema, public space, and architecture. Over the last thirty years, he has realized over fifty urban projects worldwide, in cities from Antwerp to Zagreb. His work has been the subject of seventy-five solo exhibitions in museums and galleries throughout North America and Europe and is included in public collections both here and abroad. Adams has taught at numerous institutions including: Parsons School of Design, New York; École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts, Paris; Rijksakademie van Beeldende Kunsten, Amsterdam; and the Akademie der Bildenden Künste, Munich. From 1997 to 2001, he was Director of the Visual Arts Program and Professor in the Department of Architecture at MIT. He is currently a Professor at the Cooper Union in New York City.

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Azra Akšamija is an artist and educator, the Class of 1922 Career Development Professor and Assistant Professor of the Arts in MIT’s Program in Art, Culture and Technology. She holds a degree from the Technical University in Graz, Austria, a MArch from Princeton University, and received her Ph.D. from MIT in 2011. Akšamija investigates the politics of identity and memory on the body (clothing and wearable technologies), on the civic scale (religious architecture and cultural institutions), and within the context of history and global cultural flows. Her recent work focuses on the representation of Islam in the West, architecture and nationalism in the Balkans since the 1990s, and the role of cultural heritage in constructing common virtue in divided societies. Her work has been exhibited in international venues such as at the Generali Foundation (Vienna), Liverpool Biennial, Museum of Contemporary Art (Zagreb), SculptureCenter (New York), Secession (Vienna), the Royal Academy of Arts (London), Jewish Museum (Berlin), Queens Museum of Art in New York, Manifesta 7, and the Fondazione Giorgio Cini as a part of the 54th Art Biennale in Venice. She is recipient of the Aga Khan Award for Architecture in 2013.

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Jennifer Allora is an artist who co-founded Allora & Calzadilla with Guillermo Calzadilla, in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Collaborating since 1995, Allora & Calzadilla has produced an expansive and interdisciplinary body of work, combining performance, sculpture, video, and sound. Their work emerges from the strategic collision of objects, gestures, marks and contexts, all informed by a keen sense of research. Their unexpected juxtapositions reflect everything from history to contemporary geo-political realities, exposing, de-stabilizing, and re-ordering complicated dynamics in poetic ways. The results of these formal and conceptual experiments elucidate the artists’ ongoing exploration of how metaphor can reflect, reshape, and ultimately transform how the world appears to us and how we respond to it. The duo has exhibited widely and in 2011 represented the USA in the Venice Biennale, marking the first time artists living in Puerto Rico represented the United States. Jennifer Allora received a Master of Science from the MIT Visual Arts Program in 2003 and was a fellow at the Whitney Museum of American Art Independent Study Program.

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Ute Meta Bauer is curator and Professor of Art at Nanyang Technological University’s (NTU) School of Art, Media and Design in Singapore and serves as Founding Director of the NTU Centre for Contemporary Art. In 2010 Bauer was Founding Director of the MIT Program in Art, Culture, and Technology (ACT) and director of the MIT Visual Arts Program from 2005–2009. She was co-director with Hou Hanru of the World Biennial Forum No. 1, Gwangju, and served as Dean of Fine Art at the Royal College of Art, London. From 1996–2006, she held an appointment at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna as a Professor of Theory and Practice of Contemporary Art. For more than twenty-five years, Bauer has worked as a curator of exhibitions and presentations on contemporary art, film, video, and sound, with a focus on transdisciplinary formats. Working as an independent curator she began her institutional career as Artistic Director of the Künstlerhaus Stuttgart in 1990, where she curated numerous exhibitions. She was a Co-Curator of Documenta11 (2001/2002) on the team of Okwui Enwezor and the Artistic Director of the 3rd Berlin Biennale (2004). In 2005 she curated the Mobile_Transborder Archive for inSite05, Tijuana/San Diego. Bauer was the Founding Director of the Office for Contemporary Art Norway (OCA) and served as Commissioner for the Scandinavian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale in 2003 and for the official Norwegian contribution for the São Paulo Biennale in 2004. Furthermore, she has edited numerous publications in the field of contemporary art.

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Adrian Blackwell is an artist and urbanist whose work focuses on the relation between physical spaces and political / economic forces. His artwork and design have been exhibited at artist-run centers and public institutions in Canada, the UK, the USA, and China. In the spring of 2014 he is showing Circles Describing Spheres in “if I can’t dance to it, it’s not my revolution” at Haverford College, Pennsylvania. Blackwell’s research focuses on the intertwined problems of public space and private property. His current writing examines the polarities of global neoliberal urbanization using Shenzhen as its case. Recent publications include: “Forms of Enclosure in the Instant Modernization of Shenzhen” in Volume and “What is Property? Notes on the Topology of Land as the ‘Historical Precondition’ and ‘Permanent Foundation’ of Capitalist Architecture” in the Journal of Architectural Education. He is an assistant professor at the University of Waterloo, a visiting professor at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design, and a founder and editor of the journal Scapegoat: Architecture / Landscape / Political Economy.

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Ina Blom is Professor in the Department of Philosophy, Classics, History of Art and Ideas, at the University of Oslo. Her fields of research are modernism / avant-garde studies and contemporary art with a particular focus on art, media, and technology. A former music critic, she has also worked extensively as an art critic and curator, contributing to Artforum, Afterall, Parkett, Frieze and Texte zur Kunst. Her most recent writings include On the Style Site: Art, Sociality and Television Culture (Sternberg Press, 2007, 2009) and The Autobiography of Video, in Critical Inquiry, Winter Issue, 2013. She is currently working on a book project entitled The Autobiography of Video: The Life and Times of a Memory Technology.

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Beatriz Colomina is an architectural historian and theorist who has written extensively on questions of architecture and media and whose work has been published in over 25 languages. She is Professor of Architecture and Founding Director of the Program in Media and Modernity at Princeton University. Her books include Manifesto Architecture: The Ghost of Mies (Sternberg Press, 2014), Clip/Stamp/Fold: The Radical Architecture of Little Magazines 196X–197X (2010), Domesticity at War (2007), Privacy and Publicity: Modern Architecture as Mass Media (1994) and Sexuality and Space (1992). She is curator of the exhibition Clip/Stamp/Fold: The Radical Architecture of Little Magazines 196X–197X which opened at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York in 2006 and travelled to 11 venues worldwide. Her curated exhibition Playboy Architecture, 1953–79 opened at NAi Maastricht in 2012 and is now at the DAM in Frankfurt. A recent curated exhibition of Radical Pedagogies: Architectural Education in a Time of Disciplinary Instability opened at the Lisbon Triennale in 2013 and the Venice Biennale in 2014.

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Teddy Cruz is an architect known internationally for his urban research on the Tijuana/San Diego border, advancing border neighborhoods as sites of cultural production from which to rethink urban policy, affordable housing, and civic infrastructure. Recipient of the Rome Prize in Architecture in 1991, his honors include representing the USA in the 2008 Venice Architecture Biennale, the Ford Foundation Visionaries Award in 2011, and the 2013 Architecture Award from the USA Academy of Arts and Letters. Cruz is a professor in public culture and urbanism at University of California, San Diego, where he is founding co-director of the Center for Urban Ecologies and the Blum Cross-Border Initiative. He is also a special advisor on Urban and Public Initiatives for the City of San Diego.

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Alexander D’Hooghe is an architect and director of the MIT Center for Advanced Urbanism (CAU) and principal of the Organization for Permanent Modernity (ORG). The CAU is a collaborative effort involving faculty across MIT, focused on large-scale design projects that address critical urgencies of the urban age, including climate adaptation urbanism, health + urbanism, technology + urbanism, and urbanism of the global south. ORG is a professional design firm with locations in Boston and Brussels, invested in durable architectures: simple artifacts able to handle complex demands and requirements. ORG has also developed urban models for suburban environments in the USA, for coastal environments in Europe, and for new land-making developments in Asia. D’Hooghe is associate professor in architectural urbanism with tenure at MIT, and has published internationally, notably The Liberal Monument (Princeton, Fall 2010) and recent papers in relevant journals in Germany, Israel, Spain, the Netherlands, Belgium, USA, and others. D’Hooghe obtained his Ph.D. at the Berlage Institute in 2007 with T.U. Delft, after achieving a Masters in Urban Design at the Harvard Graduate School of Design in 2001, and a master in Architecture and Civil Engineering from the University of Leuven in 1996.

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Catherine D’Ignazio is an artist, software developer and research assistant at the MIT Center for Civic Media. She previously led the Institute for Infinitely Small Things, an interventionist performance troupe, and taught from 2005–12 at Rhode Island School of Design’s Digital + Media MFA program. Her artwork has been exhibited at the ICA Boston, Eyebeam, and MASSMoCA, and has won awards from the Tanne Foundation and Turbulence.org. At the Media Lab, Catherine conducts research on the geography of the news media, creates visualizations of personal browsing histories and builds flowers that make jokes about water quality data. She is a co-organizer of the Civic Art Initiative which seeks to build bridges and shared language between artists, journalists, social movements and scholars.

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Néstor García Canclini is an Argentine-born academic and anthropologist, known for his theorization of the concept of “hybridity.” Currently his research focuses on the relationship between aesthetics, art, anthropology, creative strategies, and emerging cultural networks. He received his PhD in Philosophy at the Université Paris X Nanterre. He has taught at universities in Barcelona, ​​Buenos Aires, São Paulo, as well as the University of Texas at Austin, Duke, and Stanford. He currently works at the Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana in Mexico City and is the director of its program of studies in urban culture. He received a Guggenheim Fellowship, Essay House award in recognition of the Americas Popular Capitalistic Cultures. His books include Hybrid Cultures, published by the University of Minnesota Press in 1995 and recipient of the first Ibero-American Book Award for the best book about Latin America chosen by the Latin American Association, and Consumers and Citizens, also published by the University of Minnesota Press, in 2001. Canclini sits on the Editorial Collective of the academic journal Public Culture.

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Juan Herreros is an architect and educator; Chair, Professor, and Director of the Thesis Program at the Madrid School of Architecture; as well as Professor of Architecture, Planning and Preservation at Columbia University in New York. Throughout the years he has held numerous lectures, courses, and international seminars as well as research workshops and published a significant number of books, texts, and interviews in different formats. His office Herreros Arquitectos is conceived as a collective platform through which he pursues his professional, pedagogical, and research activity. His theoretical work is focused on the re-definition of the contemporary architectural practice and its dialogue with other disciplines. His professional work has been displayed in individual and collective exhibitions and widely published and awarded. Herreros Arquitectos is currently working on projects in Spain, Norway, France, Morocco, Panamá, Mexico, and Colombia. Juan Herreros has received the International Fellowship of the RIBA (Royal Institute of British Architects), the Medal of Fine Arts from the city of San Lorenzo de El Escorial and has been nominated for the 2010 Medal from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

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Jane Hutton is a landscape architect and assistant professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. Her research focuses on the expanded consequences of material practice in landscape architecture, examining links between the landscapes of production and consumption of common construction materials. Current research projects include the geographic tracing of construction materials used in public landscapes of New York City. She is Faculty Director to the Loeb Library Materials Collection and Co-Director of the Energy, Environments, and Design research lab. Hutton is a founding editor of the journal Scapegoat: Architecture, Landscape, Political Economy, and is co-editor of Issues: 01 Service, 02 Materialism, and 06 Mexico D.F./NAFTA.

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Andrés Jaque and the Office for Political Innovation explore the potential of post-foundational politics and symmetrical approaches to the sociology of technology to rethink architectural practices. The office’s slogan is “Architecture Is Technologically Rendered Society” and is currently devoted to the study of connected — domesticities as politically —active urbanism. Jaque and the Office of Political Innovation are authors of awarded reference buildings such as the Plasencia Clergy House, House in Never Never Land, TUPPER HOME, ESCARAVOX, as well as for the first architectural performance to be included in the MoMA Collection “IKEA Disobedients” and other projects such as “12 Actions To Make Peter Eisenman Transparent” and “Superpowers of Ten.” They are authors of the publications PHANTOM. Mies as Rendered Society, Different Kinds of Water Pouring into a Swimming Pool, Dulces Arenas Cotidianas, and Everyday Politics. Their productions has been published, broadcasted, exhibited, and discussed internationally. Andrés Jaque is a Professor at Princeton University School of Architecture and he has previously taught at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP), Columbia University, Escuela Técnica Superior de Arquitectura de Madrid (ETSAM), Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM), the University of Alicante, and Bezalel Academy.

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Caroline Jones is an art historian, critic, and educator. Jones teaches contemporary art and theory; her work focuses on technology, the body, and visual art through many modes of production and circulation. She is currently a senior faculty member in the History, Theory, and Criticism discipline group of the Department of Architecture at MIT. She received an A.B. in Fine Arts from Harvard-Radcliffe in 1977, and worked in the museum field for many years, serving as an administrator at The Museum of Modern Art in New York, and Assistant Director for Curatorial Affairs at the Harvard University Art Museums. After studying at New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts, she received her PhD from Stanford University in 1992. Jones was the producer/director of two documentary films and curator of many exhibitions. She has been published in major museum publications such as Modern Art at Harvard (Abbeville, 1985) and Bay Area Figurative Art, 1950–1965 (University of California Press, 1990), the award-winning Machine in the Studio: Constructing the Postwar American Artist (University of Chicago Press, 1996/98), and the co-edited volume Picturing Science, Producing Art (Routledge, 1999). Her most recent books include Eyesight Alone: Clement Greenberg’s Modernism and the Bureaucratization of the Senses (Chicago 2005/08); Sensorium: Embodied Experience, Technology, and Contemporary Art (as editor, MIT Press, 2006). Fellowships in Berlin, Paris, and at the Radcliffe Institute (2013–14) have supported completion of the next book on the global work of art, where “work” is returned to its original function as a verb.

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Coryn Kempster earned his MArch at MIT in 2007 and has since been practicing as an architect in Basel, Switzerland. First as an Architect at Herzog & de Meuron and now as a Project Director at Harry Gugger Studio, he has designed several museum projects, each of which shares a particular focus on a sequence of novel public spaces as the organizing principle for the design of the museum. In addition, Kempster regularly collaborates with his partner, Julia Jamrozik, to investigate everyday urban situations and re-present them to be experienced anew through video, drawing, and installations. Together, they are interested in the public realm and in the way that individuals and groups use the space of the city, both inside and out. They aim to imagine and realize artworks that focus on the specificity of place and context, while simultaneously questioning assumptions about them. Ultimately, they endeavor to create objects, spaces, and situations that interrupt the ordinary in a critically engaging and playful way.

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Ana María León is a PhD candidate in History, Theory and Criticism in MIT’s Department of Architecture. Her research focuses on the intersection of modernity, pedagogy, and politics in art and architecture, which she traces as transnational networks of intellectual exchange between Europe and the Americas. Her research has been published in journals including Log, Thresholds, PLOT, and the Journal of Architectural Education. She recently edited Thresholds, the journal of the MIT Department of Architecture. Thresholds 41: REVOLUTION! turns to the history, design, and cultural production of the public realm as a site of dissensus. Her doctoral dissertation maps discussions on Surrealism, Freudian psychoanalysis, totalitarianism, and migration in Buenos Aires as they shaped the housing projects of Catalan architect Antonio Bonet.

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Matthew Mazzotta is an artist, alumna of ACT at MIT, inventor, and lecturer at the MIT Program in Art, Culture and Technology. Mazzotta’s work evolves from an interest in exploring the relationship between people and between people and their environments. His practice is conceptual and manifests as participatory public interventions that aim at bringing criticality and a sense of openness to the places we live. These socially-engaged interventions allow for a re-entry of the physical and metaphorical landscapes of our lives by provoking conversations around exploring the local, questions of ecology, public involvement, community building, artist sensibilities, science, and dissecting the systems that make up our everyday. His work is about reversing the top down one-way exchange of ideas and allowing people to contribute in a more tangible way to their own environment. Often times these projects include working with community members, laborers, academics, engineers, builders, city governments, activists, artists, poets, and anyone else that is willing to be involved in something experiential and participatory.

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Ana Miljački is an architect and Assistant Professor of Architecture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she teaches theory and design. She holds a PhD (2007) in the history and theory of architecture from Harvard University, an MArch from Rice University, and a BA from Bennington College. Her research interests range from the role of architecture and architects in the Cold War era of Eastern Europe, through the theories of postmodernism in late socialism to politics of contemporary architectural production. She recently curated and produced, with her students and collaborator Sarah Hirschman, the Fair Use exhibit at MIT in 2013. The same year, she organized a symposium Under the Influence at the MIT Department of Architecture, and her award winning research and curatorial practice Project_ mounted Project_Rorschach at the BSA Space in Boston. Praxis 14: True Stories, guest edited by Miljački was distributed for sale in February 2014. She is a co-curator with Eva Franch i Gilabert and Ashley Schafer of the USA Pavilion of the 2014 Venice Architecture Biennale.

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Antoni Muntadas, an artist and educator, was born in Barcelona in 1942 and has lived in New York since 1971. Muntadas came to MIT in 1977 to join the Center for Advanced Visual Studies (CAVS) as a research fellow. In this experimental setting, he explored topics such as the media landscape and the dichotomies between subjectivity and objectivity, and private and public. He works on projects in different media such as photography, video, publications, the worldwide web, public intervention, and multi-media installations. Since 1995, Muntadas has grouped together a set of works and projects titled On Translation. Their content, dimensions and materials are highly diverse, and they all focus on the author’s personal experience and artistic activity in numerous countries over a period of thirty years. By grouping such works together under this epigraph, Muntadas places them within a body of experience and concrete concerns regarding communication, the culture of our times and the role of the artist and art in contemporary society. He is currently Professor of the Practice at ACT in the Department of Architecture at MIT and at the Instituto Universitario de Arquitectura del Veneto in Venice.

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Otto Piene is a leading figure in kinetic and technology-based art. After studying painting and art education at the Academy of Art in Munich and the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf, and philosophy at the University of Cologne, Piene founded the influential Group Zero in Düsseldorf with Heinz Mack and Günther Uecker in 1957. Piene was the first fellow of the MIT Center for Advanced Visual Studies (CAVS) in 1968, succeeding founder György Kepes in 1974 as its director until retiring in 1994. Piene had his first solo exhibition in 1959 at Galerie Schmela in Düsseldorf and has had numerous exhibitions and retrospectives, including at the Kunstmuseum im Ehrenhof, Düsseldorf, in 1996, and at the Prague City Gallery, Prague, in 2002. His works are included in nearly two hundred museums and public collections around the world including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Nationalgalerie Berlin; the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; the National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo; the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; the Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; and the MIT List Visual Arts Center.  Piene represented Germany at the Venice Biennale in 1967 and 1971, and exhibited at Documenta in Kassel, Germany, in 1959, 1964, and 1977. Piene’s Centerbeam (1977), a pioneering multimedia work created with a team of artists for Documenta 6, was later exhibited on the National Mall in Washington, DC.  For the closing ceremony of the 1972 Munich Olympics, Piene created Olympic Rainbow, a “sky art” piece comprised of five helium-filled tubes that flew over the stadium. Piene received the Sculpture Prize of the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1996. He lives and works in Groton, Massachusetts, and Düsseldorf, Germany.

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Marjetica Potrč is an artist, architect and professor at HFBK in Hamburg, Germany. Her work has been exhibited extensively throughout Europe and the Americas, including the Venice Biennial (1993, 2003, 2009) and the São Paulo Biennial (1996, 2006). She has shown her work regularly at the Galerie Nordenhake in Berlin and Stockholm since 2003. Among her internationally important solo exhibitions are shows at the Guggenheim Museum in New York (2001) and the List Visual Arts Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2004). Her many on-site projects include Dry Toilet (Caracas, 2003) and The Cook, the Farmer, His Wife and Their Neighbour (Stedelijk goes West, Amsterdam, 2009). Since 2011, she has been a professor at the University of Fine Arts/HFBK in Hamburg. Students of her course Design for the Living World engage in participatory practice during long-term residencies in locations such as Belgrade in Serbia and Soweto in South Africa. She has also been a visiting professor at a number of other institutions, including the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2005) and the IUAV Faculty of Arts and Design in Venice (2008, 2010). Potrč has received numerous prestigious awards, most recently ithe Vera List Center for Arts and Politics Fellowship at The New School in New York (2007).

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Adèle Naudé Santos was appointed dean of the School of Architecture and Planning in 2004. Previously, she was professor at the University of California, Berkeley, College of Environmental Design where her academic focus was the design of housing environments. Her interdisciplinary courses in urban design encouraged architecture, landscape, and urban design students to collaborate and address unsolved problems in the urban environment. Before Berkeley, she was the founding dean at the University of California at San Diego School of Architecture and professor of architecture and urban design at the University of Pennsylvania where she was also chair of the architecture department for six years. She also taught at Harvard University Graduate School of Design and at Rice University. She has had numerous visiting appointments through out the United States and the world, including Italy and in her native South Africa. In addition to her academic work, she is principal architect in the San Francisco-based firm, Santos Prescott and Associates. Her architectural and planning projects include affordable and luxury housing and institutional buildings in Africa; affordable housing in Japan; the Institute of Contemporary Art in Philadelphia; the Center for the Arts at Albright College, Reading, PA; the Yerba Buena Gardens Children’s Center in San Francisco; City Links, A Vision Plan for San Diego; and Franklin/LaBrea Affordable Housing in Hollywood, CA. She recently exhibited in a solo show at the Museum of Modern Art in Kitakyushu, Japan. Dean Santos has received numerous awards and honors including being named Fellow of the American Institute of Architects in 1996. She has won numerous competitions for projects including the Perris Civic Center (CA), three facilities at Arts Park (CA), the Affordable Prototypical Multi-Family Housing for Franklin/LaBrea in Los Angeles, and Penn Children’s Center (PA). She serves as a juror for numerous national and international design competitions and award programs and has published extensively in journals and books.

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Doris Sommer is Director of the Cultural Agents Initiative at Harvard University, Ira and Jewell Williams Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures and of African and African American Studies. Her academic and outreach work promote development through arts and humanities, specifically through the Pre-Texts programs in Boston Public Schools, throughout Latin America, and beyond. Pre-Texts is an arts-based training program for teachers of literacy, critical thinking, and citizenship. Among her books are Foundational Fictions: The National Romances of Latin America (1991) about novels that helped to consolidate new republics; Proceed with Caution when Engaged by Minority Literature (1999) on a rhetoric of particularism; Bilingual Aesthetics: A New Sentimental Education (2004); and The Work of Art in the World: Civic Agency and Public Humanities (2014). Sommer has enjoyed and is dedicated to developing public school education. She has a B.A. from New Jersey’s Douglass College for Women, and a Ph.D. from Rutgers, The State University.

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Nader Tehrani is a Professor and Head of the Department of Architecture at MIT’s School of Architecture and Planning. He is also Principal and Founder of NADAAA, a practice dedicated to the advancement of design innovation, interdisciplinary collaboration, and an intensive dialogue with the construction industry. Previously Tehrani was a Principal and Founder of Office dA (1986-2011), where he designed award-winning projects such as Tongxian Art Gatehouse in Beijing, Fleet Library at RISD, the LEED-certified Helios House in Los Angeles, the Multi-faith Spiritual Center at Northeastern University, Banq restaurant and the LEED-Gold certified Macallen Building in Boston. Examining spaces of pedagogy, Tehrani recently completed the renovation of the Hinman Building at Georgia Institute of Technology, and is currently redesigning schools of architecture at the University of Melbourne and the University of Toronto. Tehrani’s research and installations have been exhibited in venues such as the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston, and the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas. He has authored several articles including ‘Aggregation’ and ‘Difficult Synthesis’ in Material Design: Informing Architecture through Materiality by Thomas Schropfer and ‘Versioning: Connubial Reciprocities of Surface and Space’ in Architectural Design. And his work has been internationally reviewed and published– in periodicals such as Architect, Architectural Record, Icon, Wallpaper, Monitor, The Plan, Abitare, Mark, Frame, I.D., Contract, Archiworld, the Boston Globe, the Wall Street Journal, and the New York Times, among others.

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Marrikka Trotter is a fourth-year PhD candidate in Architecture, Urbanism and Landscape at Harvard University, where her research examines the intersection between architecture and the geological sciences in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. She is the founder of the site-responsive public art and design initiative, the Department of Micro-Urbanism, and has a background in architectural practice. She is co-editor of the architectural theory volumes Architecture at the Edge of Everything Else (MIT Press, 2010) and Architecture is All Over (ACTAR, forthcoming 2014). Marrikka has taught at the Boston Architectural Center and is a guest critic at Northeastern University, MassArt, Wentworth, Harvard, and MIT. Her writing has appeared in the Harvard Design Magazine and Log.

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Gediminas Urbonas is an artist and co-founder (with Nomeda Urbonas) of Urbonas Studio: the interdisciplinary research program that explores models and devices for action in contested environments through artistic intervention that renders citizenship, publicness, and imagination for alternatives. Urbonas has established an international reputation for socially interactive and interdisciplinary practice exploring conflicts and contradictions posed by the ecologic, economic, social, and political conditions of countries in transition. Urbonas’s socially engaged and technology based practice is produced and exhibited internationally including the São Paulo, Berlin, Moscow, Lyon and Gwangju Biennales, Manifesta and Documenta exhibitions, and numerous other international shows, including a solo show at the Venice Biennale and the Museu d’Art Contemporani de Barcelona (MACBA). Gediminas and Nomeda Urbonas are co-founders of the Transaction Archive and co-directors of the Pro-test Lab Archive. Their writings on artistic research as a form of intervention in social and political crisis were published in the books Devices for Action (MACBA Press, 2008), and Villa Lituania (Sternberg Press, 2008). Gediminas Urbonas is Associate Professor and holds the Mitsui Career Development Chair in the Department of Architecture, MIT.

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Angela Vettese is an art critic, curator, and the Director of the Graduate Programme in Visual Arts at the Faculty of Arts and Design of the Iuav University in Venice, where she teaches Theory and Criticism of Contemporary Art as an Associate Professor. Angela has taught at the Bocconi University in Milan (2000/2007) and at numerous fine arts academies. Since 1986 she has written for the Sole 24 Ore Domenica magazine. Vettese has been president of the Fondazione Bevilacqua La Masa, City of Venice (2002–2013), and Director of the Galleria Civica in Modena (2005–2009). In 2009 she was president of the International Jury of the Biennale of Visual Arts in Venice. From 1995 to 2003 she was the curator of the Antonio Ratti Foundation Course. From 1993 to 1996 she was co-curator of the Premio Furla-Querini Stampalia. Angela is a co-founder of the Festival of Contemporary Art in Faenza (2007–2011). She is part of the Scientific Committee of the Palazzo Grassi-Punta della Dogana in Venice. She is currently deputy mayor for culture and tourism in Venice. She has published essays in catalogues for institutions, including the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Kunstmuseum of Basel, and has written several books in Italian and Spanish including Capire l’arte Contemporanea (Understanding Contemporary Art, Allemandi, 1996, 2013), Artisti si diventa (Becoming an Artist, Carocci, Rome 1998), Ma questo è un quadro (This is a Picture, Carocci, 2005), Si fa con tutto (You make it with everything), Laterza, 2010), and L’arte Contemporanea (Il Mulino, 2012).

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Mark Wigley is an architecture critic, curator, and an accomplished scholar and design teacher. He has written extensively on the theory and practice of architecture and is the author of several publications. Most recently, he co-edited The Activist Drawing: Retracing Situationalist Architectures from Constant’s New Babylon to Beyond (2001). Wigley has served as curator for widely attended exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art, New York; The Drawing Center, New York; Canadian Centre for Architecture, Montreal; and Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam. He received both his Bachelor of Architecture (1979) and his PhD (1987) from the University of Auckland, New Zealand. He has served as Dean of the Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation for the past ten years and will step down at the end of the 2014 academic year.

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Krzysztof Wodiczko is an artist, theorist, and educator; Professor in Residence of Art, Design, and the Public Domain at the Harvard Graduate School of Design; and a former director of the Center for Advanced Visual Studies at MIT. He is renowned for his large-scale slide and video projections on architectural facades and monuments. He has realized more than eighty such public projections in Australia, Austria, Canada, England, Germany, Holland, Northern Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Poland, Spain, Switzerland, and the United States. Since the late 1980s, his projections have involved the active participation of marginalized and estranged city residents. Simultaneously, he has been designing and implementing a series of nomadic instruments and vehicles with homeless, immigrant, and war veteran operators for their survival and communication. Since 1985, he has held many retrospective exhibitions at international institutions, more recently at DOX art center in Prague (2013). Among many awards, Wodiczko received the Hiroshima Prize in 1998 for his contribution as an artist to world peace. The Memorial to the Abolition of Slavery in Nantes, France, is a permanent public art project he developed in partnership with architect Julian Bonder and opened to the public in 2011. His major publications include Critical Vehicles: Writings, Projects, Interviews (MIT Press, 2003) and a comprehensive monograph Krzysztof Wodiczko (Black Dog, 2011). He is currently working on new retrospective exhibitions in Poland and England as well as on developing new public art projects in Canada, USA, Poland, and France.

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J. Meejin Yoon is an architect, designer, and educator. She is the founder of MY Studio, co-founder of Höweler + Yoon Architecture, LLP, and the Director of the Undergraduate Program in the Department of Architecture at the MIT. She was awarded the Audi Urban Futures Award (2012), the United States Artist Award in Architecture and Design (2008), the Athena RISD Emerging Designer Award (2008), Architecture Record’s Design Vanguard Award (2007), the Architecture League’s Emerging Voices Award (2007), and the Rome Prize in Design (2005). Yoon’s work has been widely recognized for its innovative and interdisciplinary nature. Her design research investigates new intersections between public space and technology. Yoon is the author of Expanded Practice: Projects by Höweler + Yoon and MY Studio (Princeton Architectural Press, 2009), Public Works: Unsolicited Small Projects for the Big Dig (MAP Book Publishers, 2008), and Absence, a World Trade Center Memorial artist book (Printed Matter and the Whitney Museum of Art, 2003). Her work has been exhibited in the National Design Triennial at the Smithsonian Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum in New York, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Guggenheim Museum in New York, the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, the Institut Valencià d’Art Modern in Spain, and the National Art Center in Tokyo. Yoon received a Bachelor of Architecture from Cornell University with the AIA Henry Adams Medal in 1995, a Masters of Architecture in Urban Design with Distinction from Harvard University in 1997, and a Fulbright Fellowship for independent research to Seoul, Korea in 1998.

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