Renée Green, Artist
Mise-en-Scène: Commemorative Toile , 1992–94
Medium
Photograph, upholstered chair, wall treatment, wallpaper
Dimensions
Dimensions variable
Credit Line
Photograph, courtesy of the artist and Free Agent Media; chair, collection of Eileen Harris Norton; wallpaper, courtesy of the artist, Free Agent Media, and the Fabric Workshop. Installation view, Galerie im Taxisplais, Innsbruck, Austria, 2004, courtesy of the artist and Free Agent Media (photo: Rainer Iglar)
Renée Green, Artist Mise-en-Scène: Commemorative Toile , 1992–94 Medium Photograph, upholstered chair, wall treatment, wallpaper Dimensions Dimensions variable Credit Line Photograph, courtesy of the artist and Free Agent Media; chair, collection of Eileen Harris Norton; wallpaper, courtesy of the artist, Free Agent Media, and the Fabric Workshop. Installation view, Galerie im Taxisplais, Innsbruck, Austria, 2004, courtesy of the artist and Free Agent Media (photo: Rainer Iglar)

Title: Lost in America
Format: Group exhibition
Location:  Neuer Berliner Kunstverein (n.b.k.), Berlin
Dates: September 10, 2020-January 17, 2021

Renée Green’s works in the exhibitionCommemorative Toile Suit, 1994, suit made of custom-made fabric designed by the artist; Commemorative Toile: Mise-en-Scène, 2020. Digital film, color, sound, 6 min.

Other artists in the exhibition: Michael Asher, Sam Durant, Jimmie Durham, Andrea Fraser, Dan Graham, Mike Kelley, Ken Lum, Adrian Piper, Martha Rosler, Cameron Rowland, Robert Venturi / Denise Scott Brown, and others

From the press release: “With Lost in America, Neuer Berliner Kunstverein (n.b.k.) presents a group exhibition [curated by artist John Miller] of works by American artists from 1937 to the present which sharpens our understanding of the current political situation in the USA. The exhibition revisits American history with investigations of the influences and developments that have shaped the identity of the United States through its specific national and political economy […] Lost in America is concerned with the ideological formation of modes of production and urban planning, architecture, and design, and with the overarching institutionalization of discriminatory dispositives. In doing so, it ultimately highlights the inherent potential of conceptual art practices to expose and critique the structures that underpin society.”